Sunday, February 6, 2011

Wedgey!

I worked the patch this morning, for the first time since November.  The landscape looks very different now, with dry season having turned everything brown, and thinning the canopies of most trees.

I found a number of fruiting trees, one of which was receiving a lot of attention from BLACK-NAPED ORIOLES and a small party of RED-WHISKERED BULBULS.  Also visiting this tree was this female WEDGE-TAILED GREEN PIGEON, a forest species from northern and western Thailand...



I presumed that this was an escaped cagebird from Chatuchak Market, and close examination of a couple of the images I took seem to support this theory...

Note the heavy wear on the primaries of the right wing (against the sky)

Note significant wear on the tip of the tail.

Other birds seen this morning included YELLOW BITTERN and ASIAN BARRED OWLET, with sibes represented by two THICK-BILLED WARBLERS, two BROWN SHRIKES, five or so TAIGA FLYCATCHERS, three ASIAN BROWN FLYCATCHERS and at least two YELLOW-BROWED WARBLERS.

male Asian Koel


Red-whiskered Bulbul

EDIT: My standard reference "Birds of the Bangkok Area" by Phil Round states that "Most green pigeons are noted wanderers, so there is always the slight possibility of encountering vagrants of the other Treron species", however he goes on to state that "the possibility of escaped captives of all these species cannot be excluded".  My images of the bird have been sent to a couple of people for considered opinion, so perhaps there is scope for it being a wild bird...

2 comments:

Peter Horvath said...

Your photos are absolutely incredible! Thank you so much for sharing them with your readers.

I'm hoping you might join me in a recent wildlife project we've launched.

Our ultimate goal is to build the go-to platform for documenting all the world's organisms and through doing this we hope to develop an effective way to measure Mother Nature's pulse. By encouraging the masses to document their encounters with nature, we hope to build a powerful force for data collection and an important educational tool for wildlife awareness and preservation.

We hope you'll support us on this mission by joining Project Noah today. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at peter@projectnoah.org & http://www.projectnoah.org

Peter Horvath said...

Your photos are absolutely incredible! Thank you so much for sharing them with your readers.

I'm hoping you might join me in a recent wildlife project we've launched.

Our ultimate goal is to build the go-to platform for documenting all the world's organisms and through doing this we hope to develop an effective way to measure Mother Nature's pulse. By encouraging the masses to document their encounters with nature, we hope to build a powerful force for data collection and an important educational tool for wildlife awareness and preservation.

We hope you'll support us on this mission by joining Project Noah today. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at peter@projectnoah.org & http://www.projectnoah.org